Episodes

16: Say, ‘No’ and Do Less

Time management is a practice. It takes vigilance and commitment to protect your valuable time from competing responsibilities. Check out this episode to hear how Crina and Kirsten approach their work and their commitments in their busy lives.

SHOW NOTES

Following on the heels of episode 11, The Crushing Burden, Crina and Kirsten continue their exploration of the things we juggle as professional, working woman In this episode, Crina and Kirsten turn to the practical while exploring how they each manage their time, how their values dictate their priorities, and where they spend their time.

Kirsten checks in about her work to minimize her commitments while honoring her values. She talks about how she struggles to juggle responsibilities from her job, community, family and friends. Crina explores how her approach to time management is different from Kirsten’s and likely a product of her
willingness to say, “no.”

In addition to exploring their own styles, they also offer tips and tricks and strategies to help listeners get a grip on their own schedules. For instance, Kirsten recommends eating your big hairy frog first and Crina encourages listeners to choose themselves first. As always, Crina and Kirsten get real about the need to say, “no.”

LINKS

Productivity Isn’t About Time Management. It’s About Attention Management.

Click here to subscribe to our podcast on Apple PodcastsGoogle Play MusicStitcherTuneIn, and wherever you listen to podcasts.

Send us your stories, questions, feedback, and comments to: yougettowork@gmail.com

15: Gratitude and Praise Will Change Your Work Life

Let’s face it, feeling good and getting acknowledged feels good. When someone notices that you worked hard, did something amazing, pushed through a barrier or overcome a challenge, it makes you feel motivated to do more. Unfortunately, the vast majority of workers report that they have not received positive feedback about their work performance in the last year! Join us as we explore how to change this phenomenon while using praise and gratitude to create ease and joy at work.

SHOW NOTES

In this episode of Crina and Kirsten Get to Work, Crina and Kirsten talk about how critical it is to have gratitude and praise in the workplace. In fact, most workers site praise and meaning as one of the most important elements of job satisfaction.  Let’s face it, feeling good and getting acknowledged feels good.  When someone notices that you worked hard, did something amazing, pushed through a barrier or overcome a challenge, it makes us feel motivated to do more.  

Unfortunately, the vast majority of workers report that they have not received positive feedback about their work performance. Say it ain’t so!! If this is your work culture, there are things you can do to change it for yourself, your coworkers and your organizational culture. Gratitude is not only good for the receiver, but also for the giver.

If you want to start giving praise and sharing gratitude there are a few keys to be successful.  Be sure that you are giving praise in a way that works for the listener.  Some people like to hear feedback in public, some people prefer private praise, some of us like to see positive comments in writing and others value a gift or a pat on the back.  Positive comments are also more meaningful if they are specific and timely.

It’s also important to know yourself and know how you like to receive feedback.  If you’re like Crina, you might even try asking your employer for what you want. 

In addition to seeking external gratification, Crina and Kirsten remind listeners to own their power and accomplishments. Remember that you are awesome!

Listen in – you’ll be grateful!

LINKS

Why Appreciation Matters So Much

The Psychological Effects of Workplace Appreciation and Gratitude

14 Health benefits of Practicing Gratitude According to Science

Power Your Tribe Book

Click here to subscribe to our podcast on Apple PodcastsGoogle Play MusicStitcherTuneIn, and wherever you listen to podcasts.

Send us your stories, questions, feedback, and comments to: yougettowork@gmail.com

14: Your Money AND Your Life

Some people think money equals power, others think it’s the root of all evil and some see it as a something to save and protect. What are the stories you tell yourself about money? Are you spending, saving or investing? Learn how your money script can dictate the way you think about that paycheck!

SHOW NOTES

Some people say that sex and money is where it all happens for us and where we meet up with our “stuff.”  Since Crina and Kirsten talk about work, they focus this episode MONEY.  What is your philosophy about money?  What is your money script – or what story do you tell yourself about money?  Are you someone who saves every penny or are you comfortable spending? Do you think money equals power? Is it the root of all evil or does it define you and your success? 

Crina and Kirsten also discuss how women are perceived as financial decision makers, what women think about their standard of living, investments and retirement.  

 Listen in as Crina and Kirsten tackle these issues head on while exploring their own relationships with money.

LINKS

https://www.yourmentalwealthadvisors.com/money-scripts

https://www.themuse.com/advice/5-myths-we-believe-about-women-money

https://archive.news.iastate.edu/news/2006/nov/genderinvest.shtml

https://www.govtrack.us/congress/bills/111/s181

Click here to subscribe to our podcast on Apple PodcastsGoogle Play MusicStitcherTuneIn, and wherever you listen to podcasts.

Send us your stories, questions, feedback, and comments to: yougettowork@gmail.com

13: Dealing With Assholes

We just want everyone to be kind to each other, but unfortunately that’s not always the case! In fact people are overtly and covertly mean and rude to each other all the time. The good news is that you don’t need to put up with it. Join us as we explore your options for dealing with assholes at work.

SHOW NOTES

On Crina and Kirsten Get to Work, our dynamic duo talk about those folks who behave in a way that is out of line, beyond the pale and absolutely unacceptable – you know, assholes.  Crina shares a recent experience where she and her son encountered a terribly mean woman who was the motivation for this show.  While not in the workplace, this story launches our hosts into a discussion of these kinds of behaviors in the workplace and what you can do about it.  And you have to have a few laughs about this frustrating folks.

We love to hear and share your stories, so write us at the email address included below!

LINKS

Our 6 Must Reads for Cutting Through Conflict and Tough Conversations (Click Here)

How to Deal with a Mean Colleague (Click Here)

Click here to subscribe to our podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, Stitcher, TuneIn, and wherever you listen to podcasts.

Send us your stories, questions, feedback, and comments to: yougettowork@gmail.com

12: How to Rock Your Job

Crina and Kirsten put on their boss hats and share all the traits they value in an employee. Spoiler alert: the best employees are self aware and lovely to be around!

SHOW NOTES

In this episode of Crina and Kirsten Get to Work, hosts Crina and Kirsten answer a simple question: what makes a good employee? Previously, they talked about how important it is for employees to identify and ask for those things that they need (or want) to make work meaningful, joyous, and fulfilling. As they discussed the importance of making those requests, one listener was intrigued to know whether there were other qualities that make a desirable worker. If you are asking yourself why another employee is having a better work experience than you are, it may be good to take Crina’s and Kirsten’s advice.

Crina and Kirsten start with the basics of being a great employee: show up on time, do the work you were hired to do, be engaged and be accountable. Then, they circle back to the importance of asking for things that you need to do your job and to do it well. More specifically, Crina and Kirsten call on employees to be truthful in their requests, as well as to pose potential solutions to any problems presented. In doing these things, you help your employer know how to ensure a satisfying work relationship with you. Other qualities a great employee has are positivity, appropriate curiosity, and the ability to keep work and personal life separate.

Our hosts also discuss the employer’s’ role in making a positive work environment for their direct reports. Employers should be intentional in finding out what their employees need. It is their responsibility to make space and time for their employees to express their concerns and   desires. Employers should They also must be secure and flexible to provide the opportunity for employees to come to creative solutions on their own.  Crina and Kirsten want women in the workplace to show up with their best selves – and ideally in a place where the employer or manager appreciates and encourages full participation.

We love to hear and share your stories, so write us at the email address included below!

LINKS

Click here to subscribe to our podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, Stitcher, TuneIn, and wherever you listen to podcasts.

Send us your stories, questions, feedback, and comments to: yougettowork@gmail.com

11: The Crushing Burden: Managing Work, Guilt and Competing Responsibilities

It’s time to release yourself from the crushing burden of guilt as you juggle work, family and community.

SHOW NOTES

In this episode of the Crina and Kirsten Get to Workpodcast, hosts Crina and Kirsten discuss “the crushing burden” that often weighs on working women as they find themselves navigating work responsibilities along with community and caregiving responsibilities. They discuss the way in which this burden tends to impact women in particular, who often have to balance work life with such things as the needs of children and spouses, volunteering, and caring for aging parents. They also address their own experiences of schedules filled with various obligations and responsibilities.

After explaining what the crushing burden is, Crina and Kirsten talk about emotions associated with the burden. They focus first (and primarily) on guilt, which is a common feeling  experienced in connection with both the challenge of juggling many responsibilities and the choices made as women try to navigate their responsibilities.  Guilt, they note, involves a sense of offense and of failing to meet an expectation. It’s distinct from disappointment, anger, and frustration, and is also a socially acceptable emotion, particularly for women.  Rather than guilt, some women experience depression and/or anxiety because of the crushing burden.  The emotions are not as social acceptable.

Having diagnosed and examined some of the emotional reactions women often have to the challenge, Crina and Kirsten turn to the response they hope to encourage in their listeners. They desire to see women move beyond feelings of guilt, anxiety and depression, and to release themselves from the expectation that they are everything to everybody, and choose to care well for themselves at least as well as they care for others. Crina, who does not struggle with guilt in the same way Kirsten does, provides insight on how to live without guilt. She and Crina discuss the value of personal well being, and consider the concept of obligations. They ultimately conclude that, while a woman should by no means abandon all responsibility, she should recognize that the obligation to self is as important if not more important than other obligations. So, they advise, treat yourself as well as you treat others.

We love to hear and share your stories, so write us at the email address included below!

LINKS

Click here to subscribe to our podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, Stitcher, TuneIn, and wherever you listen to podcasts.

Send us your stories, questions, feedback, and comments to: yougettowork@gmail.com

10: How To Get What You Want

You will be more successful if you identify and ask for what you want. And when you articulate your needs, you give your boss an opportunity to keep you happy and retain you as an employee. Focus on your needs, get comfortable asking and find more meaning on the job.

SHOW NOTES

In this episode of the Crina and Kirsten Get to Work podcast, hosts Crina and Kirsten discuss how women can get what they want in the workplace.  They suggest starting by getting clear about what you want by determining what they want and getting ready to ask for it in the most effective way negotiating for it.  They acknowledge that women’s voices are often not well represented or heard. Thus, women in the workplace will likely need to take clear, tenacious, confident steps in order to make their work experiences as satisfying, joyful, and rich as they desire them to be.

Crina and Kirsten discuss what must happen before a woman asks for change in her workplace; the woman must first determine what it is that you she wants.  Kirsten believes She should honor  her own preferences.  Be clear and pursue clarity about them, and know that asking for what she wants will provide her employer with the opportunity to create loyalty, retention, and longevity. This will also allow her employer to build business efficiency in managing well the valuable human resources of the company.  

What sorts of things can a woman ask for?  She can ask for a raise, a job title or description change, more or different benefits, a flexible schedule, training, ways to seek advancement  opportunities, physical modifications to the work space, challenging assignments and even such less tangible things as the consideration of her opinion and things that will make her feel effective safe at work.

After she has settled on what she wants, a woman should spend some time thinking about asking for it, and then actually ask. Crina and Kirsten talk through challenges that stand in the way of asking, such as fear and the difficulty of talking about money or self worth. Our hosts encourage women to be confident and willing to navigate conversations that are not as easy as they might hope.  They provide advice on how to prepare what to say, how to schedule a meeting with the appropriate decision-maker, to work to understand the perspective of the conversation partner, and to anticipate possible objections to their proposals. Given the cost of not asking and the potential for productive workplace change after asking, Crina and Kirsten are confident that women will benefit much from actively seeking the workplace change that they desire.

We love to hear and share your stories, so write us at the email address included below!

LINKS

Click here to subscribe to our podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, Stitcher, TuneIn, and wherever you listen to podcasts.

Send us your stories, questions, feedback, and comments to: yougettowork@gmail.com

9: Let me introduce you to yourself

Being self aware can be a great gift to yourself and your coworkers, but are you being perceived accurately at work? What is your personal brand? Is it accurate? Is it helping you succeed or standing in your way?

SHOW NOTES

In this episode of Crina and Kirsten Get To Work, your hosts Crina and Kirsten begin a discussion about who you are and what you are doing. This podcast has talked in depth about authenticity in the workplace. However, a part Crina and Kirsten feel they have not covered enough previously is who we are on the outside. How we perceive ourselves from the inside can differ significantly from this image that we impress on our environment.

Our hosts first encourage you to consider who you really are.  Sometimes we might be completely oblivious to our personality type, and doing some work to determine what kind of character and strengths we have can taking psychological tests can help us find out who we are and how others may perceive us. 

The hosts encourage us to consider how we react in particular situations.  Crina gives an example about how she responds. Even anecdotal evidence like how we act at a party when the music is too loud can give us good insight.  Crina says her response is to ask the host to turn down the music, while Kirsten reports that she would never be that direct. Finding out what kind of personality we have can help us ‘see’ ourselves from the outside. With this perception we can decide whether to keep qualities of ourselves, develop facets of ourselves further, or even accentuate, change and moderate certain elements so that they suit our idea of how we’d like to present ourselves to the outside world to allow us to present who we really are in a way that works for us and our workplace.

The more self-aware we are of who we are in the workplace – the more successful we can be.

Who we present in the workplace is our personal brand. In an ideal world, our personal brand and our internal world line up, thus allowing us to live an authentic life. However, over the course of time we find out new things about the people we work with and around us, we can also find out new things about ourselves in the same way. In order to find out what our personal brand is and what others perceive about us, self-reflection is a necessity. Be hyper aware of who you are in the workplace, what you want to be and use the best parts of yourself to create a positive brand and about what personal brand you want to create on your work, and try to avoid creating a negative one.

As always, we love to hear and share your stories, so write us at the email address included below!

LINKS

Click here to subscribe to our podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, Stitcher, TuneIn, and wherever you listen to podcasts.

Send us your stories, questions, feedback, and comments to: yougettowork@gmail.com

8: Horrible Bosses

Bosses come in all varieties, but one thing is clear: Women are fed up with the behaviors of their terrible bosses. Whether they’re taking credit for your work or dismissing your opinion in meetings, a boss who devalues you can ruin your work experience. Instead of putting up with this, it might be time to make an exit plan!

SHOW NOTES

In this episode of Get To Work, your hosts, Crina and Kirsten, discuss bad and horrible bosses. A few characteristics that typically marks a bad boss are micromanagement, macromanagement, failure to communicate with staff, not being solution oriented, or being all about oneself.

There are so many difficult behaviors that characterize bad bosses that BambooHR has created a Bad Boss Index (click here). Some traits of horrible bosses that were found were:  having a condescending attitude, having a mean or bad temper, inappropriate behavior, micromanaging and harassment of ing the employees. An interesting finding in from their research was that women are more annoyed by horrible bosses about most behaviors than men, except for a few noted specific behaviors that seem to set off men more. But altogether, what made people the angriest was when someone took credit for their work.

In general, all behaviors that make employees feel devalued are characteristic of terrible  bosses. If you find yourself in such a situation, Crina and Kirsten offer solutions. Some people may decide to leave the the current toxic situation. If so, create your exit plan, but in the meantime do your very best work but still do the best work you can. They suggest the mindset you have to have is to create the best springboard to for your next job. And in the meantime, document your experience. Journaling allows you to track your experiences and make decisions with the best information.  Crina and Kirsten offer strategies to deal with horrible bosses.  These will enable you to improve yourself, your position, and figure out whether you were right at the time. And if you found yourself as the boss doing the above – please stop immediately.

We love to hear and share your stories, so write us at the email address included below!

LINKS

Check out the BambooHR’s Bad Boss Index (click here)

Click here to subscribe to our podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, Stitcher, TuneIn, and wherever you listen to podcasts.

Send us your stories, questions, feedback, and comments to: yougettowork@gmail.com

7: Mr. Magoo: Unconscious Incompetence

Being “blissfully unaware” is not blissful for your coworkers. In fact people who are unconsciously incompetent run the risk of bringing down the whole team. Do you have a coworker who doesn’t seem to “get it?” Have you ever worked with someone who was totally clueless? What “stage of competence” are you operating in? 

SHOW NOTES

Today on Get to Work, Crina and Kirsten discuss unconscious incompetence and about what it’s like to have a “Mr. Magoo” or a “Commander McBragg” in the workplace, but there are a few serious and silly conversations before they get to the meat of the topic. 

The two hosts also talk about how do you make work meaningful, joyousand fun, and how important this is considering how long we spend our days in the workplace. We’re not going for mediocre – but great! Everyone is welcome here.

The conversation starts with Crina shares sharing something that’s been on her mind: dress code. Although this is not the bulk of the episode’s theme, it is worth mentioning. Crina describes a situation where show she was watching where middle school girls were worried about what to wear to a dance. The principal announces, “Don’t forget…nothing short, nothing tight…and we’re gonna have a good night!” What is this saying to young girls? Hide your sexuality, anything that might be found as attractive… and then come? The interesting thing is why the males weren’t being addressed. This topic really got Crina and Kirsten riled up – and could make for an interesting successful new episode!

Next, the two discuss Mr.Magoo. Remember the cartoon with the short bald man? He walks (and drives) through the world with his eyes closed and bumps into things – portraying a hilarious juxtaposition. Are  people in your workplace like Mr. Magoo? This is where unconscious incompetence comes in.

Crina and Kirsten discuss Noel Burch’s four levels of competency, or lack thereof.

Sometimes unconscious incompetence is a beautiful place to be. It could be the feeling you  have when you start a new job. The unfortunate thing is when someone stays in this phase for too long…especially when it’s your boss. Crina talks about an experience she had with a boss who was unconsciously incompetent – he did not know what he did not know. Crina ended up reaching out to the board letting them know that  he needed to move on as there was too much risk.  Think the old, outdated cartoon called CommanderMcBragg. Luckily, her organization had a 360 Review Process and the feedback was unanimous.  The worst-case scenario is your boss struggling with unconscious incompetence. If your co-worker is the one dealing with unconscious incompetence, it would be a great idea to create a relationship with them. You can offer support and a lot of details. A lot of these situations are not in your control so you will have to decide what works best for you.

Do you have a situation or story to share? Crina and Kirsten would love to hear from you!

LINKS

Learn more about Noel Burch (click here)

Click here to subscribe to our podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, Stitcher, TuneIn, and wherever you listen to podcasts.

Send us your stories, questions, feedback, and comments to: yougettowork@gmail.com