Episodes

6: What is your professional mindset? Scarcity vs. Abundance in the workplace.

Your mindset determines your experience at work. When you encounter problems at work, do you feel stuck or do you feel like you have options? Are you constantly reacting or do you feel like you’re in the driver’s seat? Do you experience joy or are you frequently upset? Are you seeing your job from an abundance perspective or are you mired in scarcity?

SHOW NOTES

This episode of Get To Work is about finding your own professional mindset. Many find it hard to accept that we have control of our own mindset. In this episode, Crina and Kirsten tell you how you can not only identify yours, but develop it to help you better reach your goals.

Crina and Kirsten’s discussion of professional mindsets centers around the idea of scarcity vs. abundance, not as it is related just to money, but in the opportunities you have around you. Crina and Kirsten share how these mindsets manifest themselves in the workplace and impact work. For an abundant mindset, you need to see possibilities, have big ideas, be able to stretch these ideas, and find the time to accomplish them. People with a scarcity mindset have few ideas, see few opportunities and are often scared by change in their professional life. Our hosts mention that you should consider whether you are proactive vs. reactionary, are you happy or are you resentful, do you see solutions or road blocks, or do you create energy in a room or do you drain it. Take time to reflect on how you engage in your life.

The biggest factor that we have control over in the workplace is our own mindset. Reflect and be aware of your mindset. We can choose to let go of our limited or scarcity mindset and cultivate and abundance mindset to open ourselves up to more possibilities and find how much more we’re capable of in the workplace.

We love to hear and share your stories, so write us at the email address included below!

LINKS

Check out The Remarkable Advantage of Abundant Thinking (click here)

Click here to subscribe to our podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, Stitcher, TuneIn, and wherever you listen to podcasts.

Send us your stories, questions, feedback, and comments to: yougettowork@gmail.com

5: It’s up to you, sister!

All women benefit when we support each other. This is especially true at work as women are demanding to be heard, competing for jobs, asking for promotions and battling for positions of leadership. Women supporting other women the key to all of our success.

SHOW NOTES

In this episode of Get To Work, hosts Crina and Kirsten talk about lifting women up in the workplace, supporting and advancing each other, and punching the patriarchy in the face.

Crina talks about her new consulting firm, and how hard it is to deal with the lack of feedback she gets from being her own boss. She tells a story about running into one of her clients at the grocery store, and her client spoke some kind words and encouraged her in her work. It’s those acts of kindness and words of affirmation that energize your trajectory, and it shows the importance of being generous with your compliments.  This is the kind of support our hosts discuss in this episode on lifting each other up in the workplace.

Our hosts talk about the glass ceiling preventing women from entering leadership roles. They reference the study Women In The Workplace 2018 by LeanIn.org (click here). According to the study, women earn more bachelor’s degrees than men. Women were also found to be staying in the workplace just as long as men and they ask for raises and promotions as much as men. If all these things are true, how are women not promoted and hired as frequently? What are the barriers to climbing the ladder? Much of it is a result of gender discrimination and bias. Both men and women have can have this bias.

How can we help and support each other to counter the effects of discrimination in the workplace.  It’s women’s responsibility to lift each other up and help each other. Kirsten uses the women of the Obama administration as an example of women that do just that. It’s important to mentor other women or just be intentional with developing relationships with other women in your workplace.

We love to hear and share your stories, so write us at the email address included below!

LINKS

Click here to subscribe to our podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, Stitcher, TuneIn, and wherever you listen to podcasts.

Send us your stories, questions, feedback, and comments to: yougettowork@gmail.com

4: Build a Women’s network!

In a world where who you know is even more important than what you know, it’s vital that you build a strong network. Learn about how Crina and Kirsten have succeeded and struggled in their attempts to develop a “good ‘ole girls’ club” for themselves.

SHOW NOTES

On this episode of Get To Work, Crina and Kirsten consider the importance of networking. Specifically, the challenges that women face when it comes to networking. Crina and Kirsten offer ways that listeners can engage those challenges. Our hosts begin the episode by sharing their own social media usage, or lack thereof. They discuss how social media can be one a tool for networking depending on where you are at in your career.

Crina and Kirsten discuss the ‘why’ and ‘how’ behind networking. Shocking to both hosts, 70% of people in 2016 were hired at a company where they already had a connection there. Additional statistics found that 80% of professionals consider networking to be one of the core components of their success; while 35% of folks say that a casual conversation with another person has led to a significant opportunity. Networking seems to be the “magic ingredient” to success. Crina talks about the networking challenges she faced while working for a non-profit and how she’s changed her strategy now that she’s a consultant. Going to events does not necessarily equate to making personal connections with people in the community.

Now, as a consultant, her entire business is based on networking; including utilizing the personal connections she’s made over the course of her career.

Kirsten and Crina discuss the challenges women specifically face in networking. These challenges include a woman being concerned that a networking opportunity with a man may be perceived as some sort of advance. Another is the would be a competition mindset that says there can only be so many women “at the top”. They suggest women-only networking circles as a solution to some of those challenges. Women should be more intentional about networking with other women. Kirsten tells a story about one of her networking failures, and our hosts finish by talking about the benefits of keeping a written list of people in your network.

We love to hear and share your stories, so write us at the email address included below!

LINKS

Click here to subscribe to our podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, Stitcher, TuneIn, and wherever you listen to podcasts.

Send us your stories, questions, feedback, and comments to: yougettowork@gmail.com

3: Are you engaged (at work)?

Are you one of the millions of workers who is disengaged at work? Do you spend more time shopping for shoes online, planning your next vacation or flirting with your coworkers than you do on productive projects? It’s time to break the cycle and start investing in your career!

Show Notes

In this episode of Crina and Kirsten Get To Work, your hosts sit down to discuss disengagement in the workplace, how it contributes to dissatisfaction in the workplace and how we can become more engaged.. Before delving into this subject, we take a little detour to consider ‘Marie Kondo-ing our heads’ and the value of trimming out activities and other time thieves from our lives to focus on what’s most important. By revaluating your time and how you use it, Kirsten points out how we can maintain ease, joy, and meaning – in addition to our well-being, connections, curiosity, productivity, creativity, and generally, living a wholesome life. This revaluation helps put quality over quantity. 

And on to disengagement . . . .

Gallup’s 2018 poll (click here) regarding the state of the American workplace shows that 70% of U.S. workforce is disengaged while at work. This is a staggering number.  And 13% are actively disengaged – meaning they are actually sabotaging or getting in the way of work. Lots of these folks  are actively looking for new jobs.  Wow – that is a lot of unhappy people and gloomy findings! When employees are disengaged with their work, they start exhibiting questionable and unacceptable behavior. This includes sleeping, napping, sexual acts, browsing, watching movies and series, online shopping, new workplace shopping, and basically everything that is not your job.   Disengagement is a symptom of a bigger problem and an indication that we need to do something else to become more engaged.  We cannot have joy, meaning, fun and productivity in the workplace when we are disengaged.  As Kirsten says, when sex, drugs and rock and roll are part of your workday – good to check in!

Crina and Kirsten offer a few helpful ways to assess our own engagement or disengagement.  We can ask ourselves some questions, such as: ‘do I feel committed to the mission?’; ‘do I feel like part of the team?’; ‘do I have access to the things I need to do my job?’; ‘is there something new for me to learn?’; ‘do I feel valued and recognized?’. The answers to these questions can give you valuable insight into your disengagement or engagement with your workplace, and help you change things for the better. The fact is – you can improve matters. You can approach your manager and ask for help about doing your job and getting what you want out of it. Don’t let yourself be disengaged further when you can change the situation for the better.

Links

Harper, Jim. “Employee Engagement on the Rise in the U.S.” Gallop, 26 Aug. 2018 (click here)

Click here to subscribe to our podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, Stitcher, TuneIn, and wherever you listen to podcasts.

Send us your stories, questions, feedback, and comments to: yougettowork@gmail.com

2: The Real Deal: Authenticity in the Workplace

Can you bring your whole self to work? How much of the “real” you should you show to your coworkers. Join us as we explore the difference between authenticity and drama in the work place.

SHOW NOTES

In this episode of Get To Work, Crina and Kirsten discuss authenticity in the workplace and whether it’s important and appropriate to bring your whole self to work.. Sometimes it may feel like being who we truly are at work is very challenging. We may feel like we have to separate ourselves, dividing our personalities into our ‘work-self’ and our ‘everything-else-self’ . This is a very common phenomenon – so we are not alone there. 

The two hosts share how studies have shown that people who are able to be more authentic at work are more satisfied and more productive. Bosses, managers, and other employees actually value authenticity in the workplace. However, there is a need for a line between what’s relevant or irrelevant for your work.

An additional advantage to being more authentic at work is that people will likely trust you more. People are drawn to people who are authentic, because they can trust them. Just assume the best when being more authentic – and watch how it develops into something beautiful.

Crina and Kirsten advise to trust the process. Bring your whole self, but don’t bring your whole drama. Be focused, genuine, and open your soul to vulnerability and establishing relations with your environment at work. What awaits you at the end of the whole process is an outcome that you will not even believe was possible – and one that will increase your happiness, satisfaction and joy in the workplace. 

We love to hear and share your stories, so write us at the email address included below!

LINKS

Click here to subscribe to our podcast on Apple PodcastsGoogle Play MusicStitcherTuneIn, and wherever you listen to podcasts.

Send us your stories, questions, feedback, and comments to yougettowork@gmail.com

1: Do You Want to Be My Friend?

Having a friend at work is one of the most important ways to feel satisfied and supported at your job. Crina and Kirsten want you to invest in getting to know your coworkers so you can thrive at work!!

SHOW NOTES

In this episode of Get To Work, Crina and Kirsten discuss the benefits and challenges of developing friendships in the workplace. They start by posing the question, “What does it mean for someone to be a ‘friend’?,” and our hosts get real with each other when discussing the vulnerability it takes to get to such a place in a relationship. Crina and Kirsten about how different age groups and different types of people approach workplace friendships differently.  

Some want to be friends with all their coworkers, and some view it as unprofessional.

According to Aristotle’s , there are three types of friendship — Utility, Pleasure, and of the Mutual Good (based on mutual appreciation). The hosts describe these types of friendships in depth, allowing some observation into others’ experiences and relationships within these categories. The three types involve different levels of trust and intimacy. Using examples from their own experience, Kirsten and Crina discuss how they’ve seen these types play out in the workplace. Crina and Kirsten have different perspectives on depth and quantity of friendships.

Our hosts discuss how one of the biggest predictors of your satisfaction in the workplace is whether or not you have a friend. Having someone you feel connected to in the workplace, influences happiness while working, but can also come with problems. One such issue is feeling left out when others have exhibited interconnectedness. Crina and Kirsten share instances in which they felt left out. Also shared are different ways they’ve seen others take initiative in developing workplace friendships, as well as the ways they’ve observed people set up boundaries.

We love to hear and share your stories, so write us at the email address included below!

LINKS

Click here to subscribe to our podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, Stitcher, TuneIn, and wherever you listen to podcasts.

Send us your stories, questions, feedback, and comments to: yougettowork@gmail.com