Episodes

9: Let me introduce you to yourself

Being self aware can be a great gift to yourself and your coworkers, but are you being perceived accurately at work? What is your personal brand? Is it accurate? Is it helping you succeed or standing in your way?

SHOW NOTES

In this episode of Crina and Kirsten Get To Work, your hosts Crina and Kirsten begin a discussion about who you are and what you are doing. This podcast has talked in depth about authenticity in the workplace. However, a part Crina and Kirsten feel they have not covered enough previously is who we are on the outside. How we perceive ourselves from the inside can differ significantly from this image that we impress on our environment.

Our hosts first encourage you to consider who you really are.  Sometimes we might be completely oblivious to our personality type, and doing some work to determine what kind of character and strengths we have can taking psychological tests can help us find out who we are and how others may perceive us. 

The hosts encourage us to consider how we react in particular situations.  Crina gives an example about how she responds. Even anecdotal evidence like how we act at a party when the music is too loud can give us good insight.  Crina says her response is to ask the host to turn down the music, while Kirsten reports that she would never be that direct. Finding out what kind of personality we have can help us ‘see’ ourselves from the outside. With this perception we can decide whether to keep qualities of ourselves, develop facets of ourselves further, or even accentuate, change and moderate certain elements so that they suit our idea of how we’d like to present ourselves to the outside world to allow us to present who we really are in a way that works for us and our workplace.

The more self-aware we are of who we are in the workplace – the more successful we can be.

Who we present in the workplace is our personal brand. In an ideal world, our personal brand and our internal world line up, thus allowing us to live an authentic life. However, over the course of time we find out new things about the people we work with and around us, we can also find out new things about ourselves in the same way. In order to find out what our personal brand is and what others perceive about us, self-reflection is a necessity. Be hyper aware of who you are in the workplace, what you want to be and use the best parts of yourself to create a positive brand and about what personal brand you want to create on your work, and try to avoid creating a negative one.

As always, we love to hear and share your stories, so write us at the email address included below!

LINKS

Click here to subscribe to our podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, Stitcher, TuneIn, and wherever you listen to podcasts.

Send us your stories, questions, feedback, and comments to: yougettowork@gmail.com

8: Horrible Bosses

Bosses come in all varieties, but one thing is clear: Women are fed up with the behaviors of their terrible bosses. Whether they’re taking credit for your work or dismissing your opinion in meetings, a boss who devalues you can ruin your work experience. Instead of putting up with this, it might be time to make an exit plan!

SHOW NOTES

In this episode of Get To Work, your hosts, Crina and Kirsten, discuss bad and horrible bosses. A few characteristics that typically marks a bad boss are micromanagement, macromanagement, failure to communicate with staff, not being solution oriented, or being all about oneself.

There are so many difficult behaviors that characterize bad bosses that BambooHR has created a Bad Boss Index (click here). Some traits of horrible bosses that were found were:  having a condescending attitude, having a mean or bad temper, inappropriate behavior, micromanaging and harassment of ing the employees. An interesting finding in from their research was that women are more annoyed by horrible bosses about most behaviors than men, except for a few noted specific behaviors that seem to set off men more. But altogether, what made people the angriest was when someone took credit for their work.

In general, all behaviors that make employees feel devalued are characteristic of terrible  bosses. If you find yourself in such a situation, Crina and Kirsten offer solutions. Some people may decide to leave the the current toxic situation. If so, create your exit plan, but in the meantime do your very best work but still do the best work you can. They suggest the mindset you have to have is to create the best springboard to for your next job. And in the meantime, document your experience. Journaling allows you to track your experiences and make decisions with the best information.  Crina and Kirsten offer strategies to deal with horrible bosses.  These will enable you to improve yourself, your position, and figure out whether you were right at the time. And if you found yourself as the boss doing the above – please stop immediately.

We love to hear and share your stories, so write us at the email address included below!

LINKS

Check out the BambooHR’s Bad Boss Index (click here)

Click here to subscribe to our podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, Stitcher, TuneIn, and wherever you listen to podcasts.

Send us your stories, questions, feedback, and comments to: yougettowork@gmail.com

7: Mr. Magoo: Unconscious Incompetence

Being “blissfully unaware” is not blissful for your coworkers. In fact people who are unconsciously incompetent run the risk of bringing down the whole team. Do you have a coworker who doesn’t seem to “get it?” Have you ever worked with someone who was totally clueless? What “stage of competence” are you operating in? 

SHOW NOTES

Today on Get to Work, Crina and Kirsten discuss unconscious incompetence and about what it’s like to have a “Mr. Magoo” or a “Commander McBragg” in the workplace, but there are a few serious and silly conversations before they get to the meat of the topic. 

The two hosts also talk about how do you make work meaningful, joyousand fun, and how important this is considering how long we spend our days in the workplace. We’re not going for mediocre – but great! Everyone is welcome here.

The conversation starts with Crina shares sharing something that’s been on her mind: dress code. Although this is not the bulk of the episode’s theme, it is worth mentioning. Crina describes a situation where show she was watching where middle school girls were worried about what to wear to a dance. The principal announces, “Don’t forget…nothing short, nothing tight…and we’re gonna have a good night!” What is this saying to young girls? Hide your sexuality, anything that might be found as attractive… and then come? The interesting thing is why the males weren’t being addressed. This topic really got Crina and Kirsten riled up – and could make for an interesting successful new episode!

Next, the two discuss Mr.Magoo. Remember the cartoon with the short bald man? He walks (and drives) through the world with his eyes closed and bumps into things – portraying a hilarious juxtaposition. Are  people in your workplace like Mr. Magoo? This is where unconscious incompetence comes in.

Crina and Kirsten discuss Noel Burch’s four levels of competency, or lack thereof.

Sometimes unconscious incompetence is a beautiful place to be. It could be the feeling you  have when you start a new job. The unfortunate thing is when someone stays in this phase for too long…especially when it’s your boss. Crina talks about an experience she had with a boss who was unconsciously incompetent – he did not know what he did not know. Crina ended up reaching out to the board letting them know that  he needed to move on as there was too much risk.  Think the old, outdated cartoon called CommanderMcBragg. Luckily, her organization had a 360 Review Process and the feedback was unanimous.  The worst-case scenario is your boss struggling with unconscious incompetence. If your co-worker is the one dealing with unconscious incompetence, it would be a great idea to create a relationship with them. You can offer support and a lot of details. A lot of these situations are not in your control so you will have to decide what works best for you.

Do you have a situation or story to share? Crina and Kirsten would love to hear from you!

LINKS

Learn more about Noel Burch (click here)

Click here to subscribe to our podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, Stitcher, TuneIn, and wherever you listen to podcasts.

Send us your stories, questions, feedback, and comments to: yougettowork@gmail.com

6: What is your professional mindset? Scarcity vs. Abundance in the workplace.

Your mindset determines your experience at work. When you encounter problems at work, do you feel stuck or do you feel like you have options? Are you constantly reacting or do you feel like you’re in the driver’s seat? Do you experience joy or are you frequently upset? Are you seeing your job from an abundance perspective or are you mired in scarcity?

SHOW NOTES

This episode of Get To Work is about finding your own professional mindset. Many find it hard to accept that we have control of our own mindset. In this episode, Crina and Kirsten tell you how you can not only identify yours, but develop it to help you better reach your goals.

Crina and Kirsten’s discussion of professional mindsets centers around the idea of scarcity vs. abundance, not as it is related just to money, but in the opportunities you have around you. Crina and Kirsten share how these mindsets manifest themselves in the workplace and impact work. For an abundant mindset, you need to see possibilities, have big ideas, be able to stretch these ideas, and find the time to accomplish them. People with a scarcity mindset have few ideas, see few opportunities and are often scared by change in their professional life. Our hosts mention that you should consider whether you are proactive vs. reactionary, are you happy or are you resentful, do you see solutions or road blocks, or do you create energy in a room or do you drain it. Take time to reflect on how you engage in your life.

The biggest factor that we have control over in the workplace is our own mindset. Reflect and be aware of your mindset. We can choose to let go of our limited or scarcity mindset and cultivate and abundance mindset to open ourselves up to more possibilities and find how much more we’re capable of in the workplace.

We love to hear and share your stories, so write us at the email address included below!

LINKS

Check out The Remarkable Advantage of Abundant Thinking (click here)

Click here to subscribe to our podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, Stitcher, TuneIn, and wherever you listen to podcasts.

Send us your stories, questions, feedback, and comments to: yougettowork@gmail.com

5: It’s up to you, sister!

All women benefit when we support each other. This is especially true at work as women are demanding to be heard, competing for jobs, asking for promotions and battling for positions of leadership. Women supporting other women the key to all of our success.

SHOW NOTES

In this episode of Get To Work, hosts Crina and Kirsten talk about lifting women up in the workplace, supporting and advancing each other, and punching the patriarchy in the face.

Crina talks about her new consulting firm, and how hard it is to deal with the lack of feedback she gets from being her own boss. She tells a story about running into one of her clients at the grocery store, and her client spoke some kind words and encouraged her in her work. It’s those acts of kindness and words of affirmation that energize your trajectory, and it shows the importance of being generous with your compliments.  This is the kind of support our hosts discuss in this episode on lifting each other up in the workplace.

Our hosts talk about the glass ceiling preventing women from entering leadership roles. They reference the study Women In The Workplace 2018 by LeanIn.org (click here). According to the study, women earn more bachelor’s degrees than men. Women were also found to be staying in the workplace just as long as men and they ask for raises and promotions as much as men. If all these things are true, how are women not promoted and hired as frequently? What are the barriers to climbing the ladder? Much of it is a result of gender discrimination and bias. Both men and women have can have this bias.

How can we help and support each other to counter the effects of discrimination in the workplace.  It’s women’s responsibility to lift each other up and help each other. Kirsten uses the women of the Obama administration as an example of women that do just that. It’s important to mentor other women or just be intentional with developing relationships with other women in your workplace.

We love to hear and share your stories, so write us at the email address included below!

LINKS

Click here to subscribe to our podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, Stitcher, TuneIn, and wherever you listen to podcasts.

Send us your stories, questions, feedback, and comments to: yougettowork@gmail.com

4: Build a Women’s network!

In a world where who you know is even more important than what you know, it’s vital that you build a strong network. Learn about how Crina and Kirsten have succeeded and struggled in their attempts to develop a “good ‘ole girls’ club” for themselves.

SHOW NOTES

On this episode of Get To Work, Crina and Kirsten consider the importance of networking. Specifically, the challenges that women face when it comes to networking. Crina and Kirsten offer ways that listeners can engage those challenges. Our hosts begin the episode by sharing their own social media usage, or lack thereof. They discuss how social media can be one a tool for networking depending on where you are at in your career.

Crina and Kirsten discuss the ‘why’ and ‘how’ behind networking. Shocking to both hosts, 70% of people in 2016 were hired at a company where they already had a connection there. Additional statistics found that 80% of professionals consider networking to be one of the core components of their success; while 35% of folks say that a casual conversation with another person has led to a significant opportunity. Networking seems to be the “magic ingredient” to success. Crina talks about the networking challenges she faced while working for a non-profit and how she’s changed her strategy now that she’s a consultant. Going to events does not necessarily equate to making personal connections with people in the community.

Now, as a consultant, her entire business is based on networking; including utilizing the personal connections she’s made over the course of her career.

Kirsten and Crina discuss the challenges women specifically face in networking. These challenges include a woman being concerned that a networking opportunity with a man may be perceived as some sort of advance. Another is the would be a competition mindset that says there can only be so many women “at the top”. They suggest women-only networking circles as a solution to some of those challenges. Women should be more intentional about networking with other women. Kirsten tells a story about one of her networking failures, and our hosts finish by talking about the benefits of keeping a written list of people in your network.

We love to hear and share your stories, so write us at the email address included below!

LINKS

Click here to subscribe to our podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, Stitcher, TuneIn, and wherever you listen to podcasts.

Send us your stories, questions, feedback, and comments to: yougettowork@gmail.com

3: Are you engaged (at work)?

Are you one of the millions of workers who is disengaged at work? Do you spend more time shopping for shoes online, planning your next vacation or flirting with your coworkers than you do on productive projects? It’s time to break the cycle and start investing in your career!

Show Notes

In this episode of Crina and Kirsten Get To Work, your hosts sit down to discuss disengagement in the workplace, how it contributes to dissatisfaction in the workplace and how we can become more engaged.. Before delving into this subject, we take a little detour to consider ‘Marie Kondo-ing our heads’ and the value of trimming out activities and other time thieves from our lives to focus on what’s most important. By revaluating your time and how you use it, Kirsten points out how we can maintain ease, joy, and meaning – in addition to our well-being, connections, curiosity, productivity, creativity, and generally, living a wholesome life. This revaluation helps put quality over quantity. 

And on to disengagement . . . .

Gallup’s 2018 poll (click here) regarding the state of the American workplace shows that 70% of U.S. workforce is disengaged while at work. This is a staggering number.  And 13% are actively disengaged – meaning they are actually sabotaging or getting in the way of work. Lots of these folks  are actively looking for new jobs.  Wow – that is a lot of unhappy people and gloomy findings! When employees are disengaged with their work, they start exhibiting questionable and unacceptable behavior. This includes sleeping, napping, sexual acts, browsing, watching movies and series, online shopping, new workplace shopping, and basically everything that is not your job.   Disengagement is a symptom of a bigger problem and an indication that we need to do something else to become more engaged.  We cannot have joy, meaning, fun and productivity in the workplace when we are disengaged.  As Kirsten says, when sex, drugs and rock and roll are part of your workday – good to check in!

Crina and Kirsten offer a few helpful ways to assess our own engagement or disengagement.  We can ask ourselves some questions, such as: ‘do I feel committed to the mission?’; ‘do I feel like part of the team?’; ‘do I have access to the things I need to do my job?’; ‘is there something new for me to learn?’; ‘do I feel valued and recognized?’. The answers to these questions can give you valuable insight into your disengagement or engagement with your workplace, and help you change things for the better. The fact is – you can improve matters. You can approach your manager and ask for help about doing your job and getting what you want out of it. Don’t let yourself be disengaged further when you can change the situation for the better.

Links

Harper, Jim. “Employee Engagement on the Rise in the U.S.” Gallop, 26 Aug. 2018 (click here)

Click here to subscribe to our podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, Stitcher, TuneIn, and wherever you listen to podcasts.

Send us your stories, questions, feedback, and comments to: yougettowork@gmail.com

2: The Real Deal: Authenticity in the Workplace

Can you bring your whole self to work? How much of the “real” you should you show to your coworkers. Join us as we explore the difference between authenticity and drama in the work place.

SHOW NOTES

In this episode of Get To Work, Crina and Kirsten discuss authenticity in the workplace and whether it’s important and appropriate to bring your whole self to work.. Sometimes it may feel like being who we truly are at work is very challenging. We may feel like we have to separate ourselves, dividing our personalities into our ‘work-self’ and our ‘everything-else-self’ . This is a very common phenomenon – so we are not alone there. 

The two hosts share how studies have shown that people who are able to be more authentic at work are more satisfied and more productive. Bosses, managers, and other employees actually value authenticity in the workplace. However, there is a need for a line between what’s relevant or irrelevant for your work.

An additional advantage to being more authentic at work is that people will likely trust you more. People are drawn to people who are authentic, because they can trust them. Just assume the best when being more authentic – and watch how it develops into something beautiful.

Crina and Kirsten advise to trust the process. Bring your whole self, but don’t bring your whole drama. Be focused, genuine, and open your soul to vulnerability and establishing relations with your environment at work. What awaits you at the end of the whole process is an outcome that you will not even believe was possible – and one that will increase your happiness, satisfaction and joy in the workplace. 

We love to hear and share your stories, so write us at the email address included below!

LINKS

Click here to subscribe to our podcast on Apple PodcastsGoogle Play MusicStitcherTuneIn, and wherever you listen to podcasts.

Send us your stories, questions, feedback, and comments to yougettowork@gmail.com

1: Do You Want to Be My Friend?

Having a friend at work is one of the most important ways to feel satisfied and supported at your job. Crina and Kirsten want you to invest in getting to know your coworkers so you can thrive at work!!

SHOW NOTES

In this episode of Get To Work, Crina and Kirsten discuss the benefits and challenges of developing friendships in the workplace. They start by posing the question, “What does it mean for someone to be a ‘friend’?,” and our hosts get real with each other when discussing the vulnerability it takes to get to such a place in a relationship. Crina and Kirsten about how different age groups and different types of people approach workplace friendships differently.  

Some want to be friends with all their coworkers, and some view it as unprofessional.

According to Aristotle’s , there are three types of friendship — Utility, Pleasure, and of the Mutual Good (based on mutual appreciation). The hosts describe these types of friendships in depth, allowing some observation into others’ experiences and relationships within these categories. The three types involve different levels of trust and intimacy. Using examples from their own experience, Kirsten and Crina discuss how they’ve seen these types play out in the workplace. Crina and Kirsten have different perspectives on depth and quantity of friendships.

Our hosts discuss how one of the biggest predictors of your satisfaction in the workplace is whether or not you have a friend. Having someone you feel connected to in the workplace, influences happiness while working, but can also come with problems. One such issue is feeling left out when others have exhibited interconnectedness. Crina and Kirsten share instances in which they felt left out. Also shared are different ways they’ve seen others take initiative in developing workplace friendships, as well as the ways they’ve observed people set up boundaries.

We love to hear and share your stories, so write us at the email address included below!

LINKS

Click here to subscribe to our podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, Stitcher, TuneIn, and wherever you listen to podcasts.

Send us your stories, questions, feedback, and comments to: yougettowork@gmail.com